Google Fiber could plug hyper-fast Internet service into a lot of  computers in the Portland Metro area.

Plans are still being developed.  But do you want it?

If you’ve ever Googled your name you may have found some of what you read isn’t accurate.  Or even true.

But there’s not much you’ve been able to do to correct those mistakes.

Now that may change.

In a landmark decision, the Court of Justice of the European Union said Google must listen and sometimes comply when individuals ask the Internet search giant to remove links to newspaper articles or websites containing their personal information.

The Associated Press reports campaigners say the ruling effectively backs individual privacy rights over the freedom of information.

In an advisory judgment that will impact on all search engines, including Yahoo and Microsoft’s Bing, the court said a search on a person’s name yields a results page that amounts to an individual profile.

Under European privacy law, it said people should be able to ask to have links to private information in that ‘profile’ removed.

It is not clear how exactly the court envisions Google and others handling complaints, and Google said it is still studying the advisory ruling, which cannot be appealed.

It is not yet known how the ruling will affect U.S. customers or whether or not the ruling can be appealed.

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