Netflix has come to terms with Comcast. The Associate Press reports the cable giant and the online streaming service have struck a deal to improve better delivery of content to Netflix subscribers who use Comcast for internet service.

Netflix accounts for about a third of all traffic on the internet, according to research. Essentially what the two companies are doing is forging a direct connection between Netflix and Comcast rather than going through third parties. This means less stuttering when you’re trying to watch “House of Cards.”

The deal comes after months of negotiation, though the terms are confidential. The statement announcing the agreement says Netflix will not receive preferential network treatment under the multi-year deal.

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2 replies
  1. Gary Jarvis
    Gary Jarvis says:

    This story is disheartening… It is good that people will be able to view Netflix with fewer issues (if Comcast is their provider)… Net-neutrality is the issue here. The FCC screwed up in its stewardship in this area by not regulating it in the first place. They are now scrambling to regain control of the argument. In the meantime, providers (such as Comcast, Verizon and Century-Link) are free to manipulate the broadband and choke off popular streams,,, The end result is for those providers to demand ever-increasing concessions from the streaming services, just like the cable companies do with networks on regular cable… I am sure we will see similar “agreements” between Netflix (and other streamers) and all other major internet providers in the near future. If anyone is not convinced that the proposed merger between Comcast and Time-Warner… As the providers become more monopolistic, there will be less and less incentive to improve infrastructure, and more and more incentive to manipulate the internet by choking off the small-time streamers in favor of the big ones… You think you pay too much now…, Just you wait!

    Gary Jarvis
    Sweet Home

    Reply
  2. Gary Jarvis
    Gary Jarvis says:

    I left out an important “end” to the sentence in which I wrote “If anyone is not convinced that the proposed merger between Comcast and Time-Warner…”, I neglected to write the end of the thought…: What I meat to state was: “If anyone is not convinced that the proposed merger between Comcast and Time-Warner is not a bad idea, think again…”

    My previous missive many make a bit more sense now (sorry about the confusing omission).

    Gary Jarvis

    Reply

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