Today is a historic day in the fight to save the Internet.  And you lost

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission on Thursday voted 3-2 along party lines to formally propose new “net neutrality” rules that may let Internet service providers charge content companies for faster and more reliable delivery of their traffic to users.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler’s two fellow Democrats on the five-member commission concurred with Wheeler for a 3-2 vote to advance his proposal and begin formally collecting public comment, though they expressed misgivings about the plan.

Oregon U.S. Senator Ron Wyden is a proponent of Net Neutrality and is championing the cause in Congress.  You can read Wyden’s concerns by following the link provided here.

Reuters reports:  More than 100 activists protested at the FCC, with signs reading “Liberate the Internet” and “Keep the Internet Free.”  Four onlookers were escorted out of the meeting room for shouting protests.

Consumer advocates want the FCC to reclassify Internet providers as utilities, like telephone companies, rather than as the less-regulated information services they are now.

Opponents have told Wheeler that stricter regulations would throw the industry into legal limbo, discourage investment in network infrastructure and still not prevent pay-for-priority deals.

Numerous technology companies, including Google Inc and Facebook Inc, have spoken out against allowing pay-for-priority, although they have not called for reclassification.

 

 

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